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Essay on Criticism [But most by numbers]

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❶There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, And drinking largely sobers us again.

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An Essay on Criticism poem by Pope. The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. In this part Pope stressed the importance of onomatopoeia in prosody, suggesting that the movement of sound and metre should represent the actions they carry: Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar. Learn More in these related Britannica articles: The mock-heroic The Rape of the Lock final version published in is an astonishing feat,….

Prosody was to be more nearly onomatopoetic; the movement of sound and metre should represent the actions they carry: Johnson, too, though he respected precedent, was above all a champion of moral sentiment….

This was An Essay on Criticism , published in Its brilliantly polished epigrams e. Early works exposition of prosodic theory In prosody: The 18th century use of end stop In end stop place in English literature In English literature: Pope literary criticism In literary criticism: Neoclassicism and its decline. Help us improve this article! From the "shameless bards" in their frenzy of forced inspiration, Pope turns his attention to the critics, and, with nice comic effect, tars them with the same brush.

He was generally considered an inferior poet, although Pope's friend Addison had time for him. Samuel Garth, on the other hand, was well-regarded, by Pope and many others, for a poem, The Dispensary , denouncing apothecaries and their cohort physicians. There was a rumour current that Garth was not its real author. Sychophancy is one of the Essay's prime targets.

Pope's rhetoric rises to a pitch as he castigates the hypocrisy of the "fops" who always praise the latest play, and the loquacious ignorance of the preferment-seeking clergy. St Paul's Churchyard, the corrupt precinct of the booksellers, may be full of bores and fools, but there's no safer sanctuary at the cathedral's altar. The Essay is rich in epigrams, still widely quoted.

Briefly allegorising, Pope goes on to contrast cautious "sense" and impetuous "nonsense", again evoking the rowdy traffic of 18th-century London with the onomatopoeic "rattling". The flow has been angrily headlong: Antithesis implies balance, and the syntax itself enacts the critical virtues.

Where, Pope asks, can you find the paradigm of wise judgement? It's not a rhetorical question. The poem goes on to provide the answer, enumerating the classical models, having a little chauvinistic nip at the rule-bound Boileau, and happily discovering two worthy inheritors of the critical Golden Age, Roscommon and Walsh.

Readers and writers today can't, of course, share Pope's certainties of taste. But we can apply some of his principles, the most important of which is, perhaps, that principles are necessary. And we might even take some tips from writers of the past. Your silence there is better than your spite, For who can rail so long as they can write? Still humming on, their drowsy course they keep, And lashed so long, like tops, are lashed asleep.

False steps but help them to renew the race, As, after stumbling, jades will mend their pace. What crowds of these, impenitently bold, In sounds and jingling syllables grown old, Still run on poets, in a raging vein, Ev'n to the dregs and squeezings of the brain, Strain out the last dull droppings of their sense, And rhyme with all the rage of impotence. Such shameless bards we have, and yet 'tis true There are as mad, abandoned critics too.

The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always listening to himself appears. All books he reads, and all he reads assails, From Dryden's fables down to Durfey's tales. With him, most authors steal their works, or buy; Garth did not write his own Dispensary. Name a new play, and he's the poet's friend, Nay showed his faults — but when would poets mend? No place so sacred from such fops is barred, Nor is Paul's church more safe than Paul's church yard: Nay, fly to altars; there they'll talk you dead; For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

Distrustful sense with modest caution speaks, It still looks home, and short excursions makes; But rattling nonsense in full volleys breaks.

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Alexander Pope, a translator, poet, wit, amateur landscape gardener, and satirist, was born in London in He contracted tuberculosis of the bone when he was young, which disfigured his spine and purportedly only allowed him to grow to 4 feet, 6 inches.

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An Essay on Criticism is one of the first major poems written by the English writer Alexander Pope (–). It is the source of the famous quotations "To err is human, to forgive divine," "A little learning is a dang'rous thing" (frequently misquoted as "A little knowledge is a dang'rous thing"), and "Fools rush in where angels fear to Author: Alexander Pope.

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Alexander Pope and the Enlightenment 'A little learning is a dang'rous thing,' Alexander Pope famously writes in his poem 'An Essay on Criticism.'The poem is one of the most quoted in the English. An Essay on Criticism, didactic poem in heroic couplets by Alexander Pope, first published anonymously in when the author was 22 years old. Although inspired by Horace ’s Ars poetica, this work of literary criticism borrowed from the writers of the Augustan Age.

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'Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill Appear in Writing or in Judging ill, But, of the two, less dang'rous is th' Offence, To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense. An Essay on Criticism was published when Pope was relatively young. The work remains, however, one of the best-known commentaries on literary criticism. Although the work treats literary criticism.